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State Energy Efficiency Policy Database

Wyoming

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Summary

Wyoming has relatively little energy efficiency programming throughout the state. Wyoming Public Service Commission approved six demand-side-management programs for Rocky Mountain Power (RMP) that began January 1st, 2009 (see Docket No. 20000-264-EA-06). Supported by the PSC, the portfolio was largely driven by resource needs identified in the utility’s IRP. These programs represent the state’s first significant energy efficiency activity.

Cheyenne Light and Power, Black Hills Power, Carbon Power & Light, Lower Valley Energy and Questar Gas also run limited sets of energy efficiency programs.

The most recent budgets for energy efficiency programs and electricity and natural gas savings can be found in the State Spending and Savings Tables on the left.

Links:

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November 8, 2013


Customer Energy Efficiency Programs

Wyoming Public Service Commission approved six demand-side-management programs for Rocky Mountain Power (RMP) that began January 1st, 2009 (see Docket No. 20000-264-EA-06). These programs represent the state’s first significant energy efficiency activity.

RMP’s 2011 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) reflected a significant increase in energy efficiency over past planning cycles. The utility forecasts energy efficiency additions through 2030. Currently, RMP offers several rebate programs RMP is responsible for about 57% of electricity sales in Wyoming. Cheyenne Light and Power, Black Hills Power, Carbon Power & Light, Lower Valley Energy and Questar Gas also run limited sets of energy efficiency programs.

Rocky Mountain Power's self-direct program is a project-based rate credit program that offers up to an 80% credit of eligible project costs back to customers as a rate credit against the 3.7% cost-recovery mechanism (CRM) charge all customers pay.  Customers earn a credit up to 100% of their CRM charge, but do pay a flat $500/project administrative fee for each self-directed project.  Customers can choose to engage in self-direct and more traditional CRM programs simultaneously, provided the different programs are used to deploy different projects.

The most recent budgets for energy efficiency programs and electricity and natural gas savings can be found in the State Spending and Savings Tables on the left.

Links:

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November 8, 2013


Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

There is currently no EERS in place.

For more information on Energy Efficiency Resource Standards, click here.


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August 9, 2013


Alternative Business Models

A three-year pilot decoupling program was approved for Questar Gas Company in June 2009 for its General Service class of customers. The pilot began July 1, 2009 and will be adjusted annually (Docket No. 30010-94-GR-8, May 2009).

A load management tracking adjustment mechanism is in place for Montana-Dakota Utilities Company to track and recovery lost revenues associated with implementation of load management programs (Docket No. 20004-65-ET-06. Filed on August 31, 2006).


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August 12, 2013


Reward Structures for Successful Energy Efficiency Programs

There is currently no policy in place that rewards successful energy efficiency programs.


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August 9, 2013


Energy Efficiency as a Resource

There is currently no policy in place that treats energy efficiency as a resource. Wyoming does have an integrated resource planning (IRP) process, although the frequency with which utilities must update these plans is not specified in the state’s rules.

For more information on energy efficiency as a resource, click here.


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August 13, 2013


Evaluation, Measurement & Verification
  • Cost-effectiveness test(s) used: TRC, UCT, PCT,SCT, RIM
  • Uses a deemed savings database: no

The evaluation of ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs in Wyoming is not required. Evaluations rely on regulatory orders specified in dockets for each utility and are mainly administered by the Wyoming Public Service Commission. Wyoming uses all of the five classic benefit-cost tests identified in the California Standard Practice Manual. These are the Total Resource Cost (TRC), Utility/Program Administrator (UCT), Participant (PCT), Societal, (SCT), and Ratepayer Impact Measure (RIM). Wyoming specifies the TRC to be its primary test for decision making. The benefit-cost tests are required for overall portfolio level screening. The rules for benefit-cost tests are not specified.


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August 21, 2013