Skip to content

State Energy Efficiency Policy Database

Kansas

#39

Related Publications & Documents

Related Items

Related External Links

Advances sound energy efficiency policies, programs, and priorities in the Midwest.

and/or...  
Compare 2 or more States



Summary

While there are no requirements for utilities to offer customer energy efficiency programs, the Kansas Corporation Commission encourages and collaborates with individual utilities on a case-by-case basis to provide customer programs. Most of the state’s utilities do offer some customer energy efficiency programs, although budgets and services available through such programs are not as expansive and comprehensive as other states. The programs primarily offer financing or rebates for energy-efficiency improvements.

The most recent budgets for energy efficiency programs and electricity and natural gas savings can be found in the State Spending and Savings Tables on the left.

Links:

Top of Page

November 8, 2013


Customer Energy Efficiency Programs

Kansas does not have any laws or regulatory rules that mandate energy efficiency programs.  In its November 2008 order in Docket No. 08-GIMX-441-GIV, the commission chose not to require energy efficiency programs from the state’s electric and natural gas utilities but determined that it would collaborate with utilities as they pursue energy efficiency as a resource (see also Docket No. 07-GIMX-247-GIV and Docket No. 08-GIMX-442-GIV). 

The majority of programs currently provided by the Kansas utilities offer rebates or financing for energy-efficient appliances and equipment for water heating, space heating, air conditioning, and lighting. There also are new homes programs and custom programs.  Generally the scale and scope of programs and services available to customers is smaller than in leading states with large program portfolios and more comprehensive sets of customer options.

The most recent budgets for energy efficiency programs and electricity and natural gas savings can be found in the State Spending and Savings Tables on the left.

Links:

Top of Page

November 8, 2013


Energy Efficiency Resource Standards
There is currently no EERS in place.
For more information on Energy Efficiency Resource Standards, click here.

Top of Page

September 2, 2010


Alternative Business Models

The Kansas Corporation Commission will consider proposals from electric and gas utilities that include decoupling on a case by case basis, however no plans have been approved for any utilities. (Docket 08-GIMX-441-GIV)


Top of Page

August 12, 2013


Reward Structures for Successful Energy Efficiency Programs

Kansas Statute 66-117 (e) allows a rate of return of 0.5% to 2% on top of the rate of return authorized for capital investments for energy efficiency investments. The Kansas Corporation Commission will consider proposals from electric and gas utilities that include shared savings performance incentives on a case by case basis (Docket 08-GIMX-441-GIV). On January 1, 2011, the KCC approved a lost-margin recovery (shared savings) mechanism for Westar Energy’s Simple Savings (Efficiency Kansas) program (Docket 10-WSEE-775-TAR).


Top of Page

August 29, 2013


Energy Efficiency as a Resource

There is currently no EERS in place.

For more information on Energy Efficiency Resource Standards, click here.


Top of Page

August 12, 2013


Evaluation, Measurement & Verification
  • Cost-effectiveness test(s) used: TRC, UCT, PCT, RIM
  • Uses a deemed savings database: no

The evaluation of ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs in Kansas relies on regulatory orders (Order in Docket No. 08-GIMX-442-GIV, Order in Docket No. 10-GIMX-013-GIV, and Order in 12-GIMX-337-GIV). Evaluations are administered by the Kansas Corporation Commission. Kansas has established formal rules and procedures for evaluation, which are stated in Docket No. 08-GIMX-442-GIV, Docket No. 10-GIMX-013-GIV, and Docket 12-GIMX-337-GIV. Evaluations for each of the utilities are conducted. Kansas uses four of the five classic benefit-cost tests identified in the California Standard Practice Manual. These are the Total Resource Cost (TRC), Utility/Programs Administrator (UCT), Participant (PCT), and the Ratepayer Impact Measure (RIM). The rules for benefit-cost tests are stated in Docket No. 08-GIMX-442-GIVand Docket No. 10-GIMX-013-GIV. Kansas specifies the TRC to be its primary cost-effectiveness test. These benefit-cost tests are required for total program and customer project level screening, with exceptions for low-income programs, pilots, and new technologies.

 


Top of Page

August 13, 2013