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State Energy Efficiency Policy Database

Georgia

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Summary

Georgia’s Integrated Resource Planning law, O.C.G.A. § 46-3A-2, approved in the early 1990s, requires the state’s regulated electric utilities to file integrated resource plans (IRPs) with the Georgia Public Service Commission (GPSC) every three years.  The IRPs must take into account any present and projected reductions in the demand for energy that may result from measures to improve energy efficiency in the industrial, commercial, residential, and energy-producing sectors of the state. To encourage utilities to use demand-side resources, Georgia statute O.C.G.A. § 46-3A-9 allows utilities to recover costs and an additional sum for commission-approved demand-side management programs. Natural gas utilities are not required to file IRPs or offer energy efficiency programs.

Georgia Power, cooperative utilities, and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) offer energy efficiency programs. The GPSC regulates Georgia Power, but not the other electric utilities. To date levels of spending and associated energy efficiency program activity have been relatively low.

The most recent budgets for energy efficiency programs and electricity and natural gas savings can be found in the State Spending and Savings Tables on the left.

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November 8, 2013


Customer Energy Efficiency Programs

Since the early 1990s, Georgia statute O.C.G.A. § 46-3A-2 has required the regulated electric utilities to file integrated resource plans with the Georgia Public Service Commission every three years.  The IRPs must consider the impact of energy efficiency improvements on projected energy demand.  The companies must file the IRPs in accordance with GPSC Rule 515-3-4, the commission’s IRP rule.  Natural gas companies are not required to file IRPs or offer energy efficiency programs.

Regulated utility energy efficiency and demand-side management programs are funded through a demand-side management rider that is applied to residential and commercial customers. Georgia Power is the only regulated electric utility in the state. Georgia Power filed its 2013 IRP in Docket Nos. 36498 and 36499. The utility runs commercial programs and offers rebates for energy-efficient homes. Each customer class is responsible for the program and incentive costs of their respective program. 

Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) also works with partner utilities to offer audits and incentives for residential and business customers. Additionally, many of the Georgia Electric Membership Corporation’s cooperatives offer rebates for installation of certain energy-efficient appliances such as water heaters, heat pumps, programmable thermostats, and compact fluorescent light bulbs.

The most recent budgets for energy efficiency programs and electricity and natural gas savings can be found in the State Spending and Savings Tables on the left.

Links:

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November 8, 2013


Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

There is currently no EERS in place.

For more information on Energy Efficiency Resource Standards, click here.


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August 9, 2013


Alternative Business Models

Georgia Code (O.C.G.A. § 46-3A-9) authorizes a lost revenue adjustment mechanism for electric utilities, but not natural gas utilities. A utility may recover costs and an “additional sum” for approved programs. According to the Governor’s Office of Consumer Affairs, Consumers’ Utility Counsel Division the purpose of the additional sum “is to compensate the utility for lost revenues and increased risks as a result of implementing conservation, load management, co-generation, and/or renewable energy technologies.


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August 12, 2013


Reward Structures for Successful Energy Efficiency Programs

By statute (O.C.G.A. § 46-3A-9), a utility may recover costs and an additional sum for commission-approved demand-side management programs to encourage development of demand-side and energy efficiency resources. For the Power Credit Single Family Program, the only approved program currently in place, Georgia Power earns an additional sum of 10% of actual net benefits of electricity savings (as determined by the Program Administrator test) if they achieve annual incremental kWh savings of more than 50% of projections for a portfolio (residential or commercial) of programs. If programs achieve less than 50% of projected kWh savings, the additional sum is 0.5% of net benefits for demand response measures and 3% of net benefits for energy efficiency measures. There is no cap on the incentive payments; however, if the incentive sum exceeds program costs, the portion of the total that exceeds the program cost is limited to 5% of actual net benefits. GP was schedule to receive no incentive payment in 2011 and half the additional sum in 2012. (See Docket 31082)


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August 9, 2013


Energy Efficiency as a Resource

Every three years, regulated Georgia utilities must file integrated resource plans (IRPs) with the commission. The plans must detail the utilities' forecast requirements, taking into account present and projected energy demands and any demand reductions that are the result of improved energy efficiency measures in any and all sectors. In Georgia Power's 2010 IRP (Docket 31081), the commission adoped a policy recognizing energy efficiency as a priority resource. Georgia Power’s most recent IRP was approved in July 2013 (Docket 36498).

For more information on energy efficiency as a resource, click here.


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September 10, 2013


Evaluation, Measurement & Verification
  • Cost-effectiveness test(s) used: TRC, UCT, PCT, SCT, RIM
  • Uses a deemed savings database: no

The evaluation of ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs is not formally required in Georgia. However, Georgia has established formal rules and procedures for evaluation, which are stated in Rules 515-3-4-.09(3)(e) 4 and 5. Statewide evaluations and evaluations for each of the utilities are conducted. Georgia uses all of the five classic benefit-cost tests identified in the  California Standard Practice Manual. These are the Total Resource Cost (TRC), Utility/Programs Administrator (UCT), Participant (PCT), Social Cost (SCT), and Ratepayer Impact Measure (RIM). The rules for benefit-cost tests are not specified, and Georgia does not have a primary cost-effectiveness test that it relies upon.


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August 9, 2013